Petrichor Press

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Our magazine: Petrichor Review

Issue 6: featuring a one hundred year and thirty-seven year-old Turkish man with the head of a hammerhead shark, cowboy boots, and buried houses.

Issue 6: featuring a one hundred year and thirty-seven year-old Turkish man with the head of a hammerhead shark, cowboy boots, and buried houses.

"The first time I robbed Tiffany’s, it was raining."
—1st sentence of “Montraldo,” by John Cheever
"Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting."
—1st sentence of The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner

"Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting."

—1st sentence of The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner

foxingquarterly:

Book Art by  Thomas Allen.

(Source: artmonia)

likeafieldmouse:

Leon Kirchlechner - Nowhere (published 2013)

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

“A Dissertation on the task of writing a poem on a candle and an account of some of the difficulties thereto pertaining”

—   The name of a recently-discovered poem written by a 17-year-old Douglas Adams. (via millionsmillions)
"When I was 9, I realized I had no sense of humor.”—First sentence of The End of the Fucking World, by Charles Forsman
"He was so quiet, so small and thin, that he was hardly there."
—1st sentence of “The Brother-in-Law” by Lydia Davis
"Snowman wakes before dawn."
—First sentence of Oryx and Crake, by Margaret Atwood

"Snowman wakes before dawn."

—First sentence of Oryx and Crake, by Margaret Atwood

“When a word spelled backward (such as ‘pots’), creates another word (‘stop’) it’s called a semordnilap, which is ‘palindrome’ backward.”

—   

51 Delightful Language Facts That Will Blow Your Mind

These are indeed delightfully mind blowing!

(via yeahwriters)

"Once upon a time, a girl named September grew very tired indeed of her parents’ house, where she washed the same pink-and-yellow teacups and matching gravy boats every day, slept on the same embroidered pillow, and played with the same small and amiable dog."
from The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland In a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente

"Once upon a time, a girl named September grew very tired indeed of her parents’ house, where she washed the same pink-and-yellow teacups and matching gravy boats every day, slept on the same embroidered pillow, and played with the same small and amiable dog."

from The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland In a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente

Murder by Geoff Collins

A man goes to the tavern one snowy night
and never returns.
His old truck sits in a municipal lot for six days
before somebody notices.

His house north of town reveals nothing.
Dishes unwashed in the sink.
Clothes neatly folded in a drawer.
A collection of figurines, finely carved from ash.

The tavern itself has five steps of cracked concrete
that lead down to the icy street.
A wrought-iron railing his hand must have gripped.
A sidewalk, an alley, and behind, the cold forest.

Detectives scour the countryside,
digging deep into the darkly wooded hills
where they find obvious signs of a great battle—
tank treads, shell casings, rusted helmets.

From the air, they discover lines of parallel ridges
that force the river into its tortured course.
Divers go down into the deeper pools,
their waterproof headlamps dancing in the darkness.

They interview the people of the town,
whose speech patterns, when analyzed
confirm that at least 26 percent of Americans
are hysterical and/or gripped by fear.

Machines record all of it, establishing the truth.
No one saw anything that night.
No one knew him.
The family cannot be found.

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